Why I left FFXIV for PSO2

@Milk I once believed that MMORPGs needed better combat and action, but with time I found out that most of the playerbase liked the genre because it required no fast reaction type like FPS or more combat focused games like PSO2.

At it's core, it's more strategical and less reaction skill based (not saying that it's bad, just different for a reason). And with time, most of the game genres became hybrids.

In the end, variety of game styles is great and hoping for wow or ffxiv to be more like pso2 might not be for the best... I would love it, but probably not everyone's cup of tea.

I could compare different genres in games being compared like trying to make a ping pong player play on the olimpics for Tennis... Like, it's pretty much the same but the table is the floor and the objects are bigger... And they would probably look at you like o_O

@LyssaDhrak said in Why I left FFXIV for PSO2:

@Milk I once believed that MMORPGs needed better combat and action, but with time I found out that most of the playerbase liked the genre because it required no fast reaction type like FPS or more combat focused games like PSO2.

At it's core, it's more strategical and less reaction skill based (not saying that it's bad, just different for a reason). And with time, most of the game genres became hybrids.

In the end, variety of game styles is great and hoping for wow or ffxiv to be more like pso2 might not be for the best... I would love it, but probably not everyone's cup of tea.

I could compare different genres in games being compared like trying to make a ping pong player play on the olimpics for Tennis... Like, it's pretty much the same but the table is the floor and the objects are bigger... And they would probably look at you like o_O

I feel like in FFXIV’s case their beautifully thought out dungeons and raids would benefit from our combat. We sort of see glimpses of it with Dancer and Bard being able to fight while they move(I mainly play healers, help me out here) but it overall just kind of feels clunky sometimes. I’m just daydreaming those fun mechanics.

Of course I know it’ll never happen but it would be pretty great!

@Blade-Syphon said in Why I left FFXIV for PSO2:

Honestly it's getting harder and harder for me to remain interested in XIV anymore. The game was fantastic during ARR and Heavensward, but ever since Stormblood it's just gone so far down the toilet - everything now just feels like SE is ticking off a checklist without actually putting any effort into the game.

The fact that I'm contemplating if I really want to slog through three hours of cut-scenes just to get access to a single dungeon, or grind through four more bosses that offer literally no challenge for gear that I'm going to replace in three months or just play Crisis Core instead kind of brings it all into light of how little XIV does to excite me anymore.

The closest Shadowbringers has come to actually keeping me enthralled was with the Bozjan Southern Front, but one slice of good content against a mountain of bad content just doesn't cut it anymore. Between PSO2, Shadowlands, and even Beyond Light, XIV just feels so terribly dated and irrelevant right now compared to the other MMOs I'm playing.

It also doesn't help that it's story has completely fallen into anime-gutter levels of plot armor and story telling. I mean, yeah PSO2 is basically "Anime - the JRPG", but it wears it's inspiration on it's sleeve, isn't afraid to poke fun at it's self, and still manages to tell a compelling story without relying on too many tropes.

XIV? Any time the story starts to meander towards something that's morally gray, or actually seems like a compelling plot device or world building element, the developers immediately reign it back and instead force-feed you the idea that the Light is good, the Dark is bad, and that everything is black and white.

So yeah, I'm with you Wyverian. I don't blame you at all for dropping XIV for PSO2. SE just doesn't seem to care to put any real effort into the game anymore, which is a shame. XIV had so much potential when it launched, but now it's just kind of turned into another generic WoW clone with no real soul of it's own.

I get the impression you just skip through the cutscenes and explanations of key point in xiv. To say SE has put no soul into the game when ShadowBringers is the best xiv has ever been is baffling to me. but hey, opinions

@XenoBladeX37645

Shadowbringers was a damn masterpiece and more games should be held to that storytelling standard. I still prefer Heavensward slightly more but both were so beautifully written!

@Milk said in Why I left FFXIV for PSO2:

@YagyuChan said in Why I left FFXIV for PSO2:

FFXIV and PSO2 are very different to each other every time I see this comparison bought up I am thinking to myself why compare the two? Personally hate FFXIV since I find it boring and not a fan of the combat (I don't disgrace the people that like it but please don't start on me to try force me to like it) I personally prefer PSO2 since I find it super fun and the story to me at least is very interesting to play with the UQ bosses being in the story so I can fight them for fun or go on some proper UQs to get them Rare Drops 🙂

I think they just compare them because FFXIV is the most popular MMO now, before it was WoW and we had games trying to be the “one to beat” WoW’s popularity. I remember when Wildstar was compared like that and they were nothing alike, either.

I don’t like FFXIV’s combat either but I have found Dancer to be fun to look at, at least. I also vastly prefer their Sunmoner to ours, the rotation for that class is so complex! But the feeling of being in the moment is just kind of lost on me when I can just lock on target and press a key. Imagine how amazing raids would be in that game if they had PSO2’s combat! Especially Nier raids!

@Doom-Smack said in Why I left FFXIV for PSO2:

@Milk Agree about the combat. This game... the gameplay itself (combat) is fun AF, affixing system and customization, the fashion and art style, the pso universe..... nnngggg. Love it all. Totally addicted.

The combat being fuuun is core to everything though for sure. Its what I loved about the first game too. Sega know how to make a game fun, something so many mmo fail at. Most fun Ive had with an online game for years.

Haha agreed with all that except affixing, I hate it. I’m having the same experience, nothing has gotten me this pumped to play an MMO since FFXIV’s Heavensward expansion. I just checked my hours, 1245 hours playing this! That’s as long as FFXIV and I’ve been playing that since launch. There’s something special about PSO2.

Just wondering. How bad is Affixing?

@KOSMOSFAN22497 If you like grindy RPGs it's not that bad, if you came only for the action then it's bad.

Pros and cons of mixing different game types.

Affixing is important, but there's no need to get the best of the best until you master your class, since we had pretty much 8 years of development and growth from players crammed into 1 year, there reality is that most of the people do not know how to properly play their classes, which is understandable and bound to happen.

I personally see the core playerbase fragmented in 3 parts:

1_ The ones who are actually good at action/fighting games and took time and effort to become good with their classes

2_ The ones who shift the blame on the equipment and affixing lacking knowledge or skill on their classes

3_ The ones who pursue fashion and community

I'm not sure which fragment will SEGA make content for in the future, but I also understand that it will come a time where I will have to leave if (not only PSO2, but any game) the content is not geared to a player like me anymore.

You just can't please everyone, and trying to do so doesn't really end up well.

@LyssaDhrak said in Why I left FFXIV for PSO2:

@KOSMOSFAN22497 If you like grindy RPGs it's not that bad, if you came only for the action then it's bad.

Pros and cons of mixing different game types.

Affixing is important, but there's no need to get the best of the best until you master your class, since we had pretty much 8 years of development and growth from players crammed into 1 year, there reality is that most of the people do not know how to properly play their classes, which is understandable and bound to happen.

I personally see the core playerbase fragmented in 3 parts:

1_ The ones who are actually good at action/fighting games and took time and effort to become good with their classes

2_ The ones who shift the blame on the equipment and affixing lacking knowledge or skill on their classes

3_ The ones who pursue fashion and community

I'm not sure which fragment will SEGA make content for in the future, but I also understand that it will come a time where I will have to leave if (not only PSO2, but any game) the content is not geared to a player like me anymore.

You just can't please everyone, and trying to do so doesn't really end up well.

I see.

@KOSMOSFAN22497 Affixing isn't "bad" on paper when you know what you are looking for but the biggest points I can try to highlight are:

  • Any attempt affixing completely wipes all currently-installed abilities on a weapon. This means that any time you affix you MUST start fresh so you only have one shot to get all the abilities you want installed at once.

  • The costs to affix scale with the number of abilities you are working with. With newer weapons introducing S-Class Special Abilities (SSA's) this gets significantly easier as the later weapons (such as Lightweaver Cras) only need you to focus on three abilities rather than eight as SSA's are a 100% success rate.

  • Recipes for affixing are important because specific abilities can be synthesized by putting specific abilities together via a range of weapons/units. Being able to use up to five fodder weapons for affixing makes this process significantly easier but much more costly.

  • Upslotting and affixing are two different processes and many players attempt trying to combine them. If you are trying to push a weapon to eight slots you want as much guarantees as possible and will likely be using "junk" abilities that have a high success rate rather than abilities that you actually want on your finished weapons. You end up wasting your resources if you're trying to upslot from 4 to 5 slots and you're throwing on "Astral Soul" on each attempt because you will lose it each time (and must get it again unless it is a Special Ability Factor from the weapon you are affixing). In addition to this, attempting to upslot also reduces the success rate for every other ability even if it previously had a 100% success rate.

  • The fodder you can use must match the number of abilities your weapon/unit has or more. This means that at eight slots you can only use other eight-slot fodder.

  • Failure in an affix (an ability failing) will result in the weapon/unit being downslotted. Without SSA's involved it is completely possible to go from eight slots to zero slots in one run. The Success Rate for individual abilities does not account for the weapon/unit itself. For example, if your eight abilities had a 90% success rate the actual success rate is (0.90^8, which is 0.90 x 0.90 x 0.90 x 0.90 x 0.90 x 0.90 x 0.90 x 0.90) is ~0.43 or 43%. Without Augmentation Aid Boosters to help you really don't want to attempt affixing until you either have backups (to upslot and try again) or until you can get to 100% on absolutely everything. With SSA's involved you definitely have a safety net (Atlas EX has four slot so at minimum you "should" fail back to four slots in the worst-case scenario but units will have a safety net of one ability due to only having one SSA slot) but you really do not want to do this to weapons and units you are not invested in.

  • Affixing has been trivialized with Augment Transfer Passes/Ability Transfer Passes which are typically limited to monthly exchanges at the Swap Shop. This allows you to swap abilities with any other weapon/unit without affecting SSA's and also still allows you to install Capsule Abilities (guaranteed success rates). This means your eight-slot unit or seven-slot unit can easily be swapped with a six-slot unit (with the affixes you want as all of them swap over) and you can still keep your SSA and install another capsule on top of that to turn it into an eight-slot unit. Due to how rare these passes are you really do not want to spend them unless you are dead-set on the affixes you want.

The best way I can compare affixing to is like the Focus tree in Warframe. In that game you get your weapons and can mod them (freely and whenever you want) so you can push your weapons to their best potential. As almost all of the equipment is horizontally scaling the modding system pushes them vertically to which some weapons definitely stand higher than others which is similar to where Phantasy Star Online 2 is with the end-game equipment. When you get to it, the Focus system (which involves some spoilers) gives the player an extra quality-of-life and extra power outside of the normal gameplay which requires some investment (grinding) to build up. When you have invested in this enough you become capable of tackling the very high-end content (which is very hard if you don't invest in this mechanic) and can trivialize previous content. Affixing a powerful weapon gives it another "flavor" and push. This largely is just a stat bump to give you more of an edge (more health, more photon points, more damage, and ultimately better-sustained combat) but due to the nature of SSA's you can even have quality-of-life changes to your weapons (life-steal, mechanical changes in the S5, unique combinations that increase photon point efficiency, damage boosts, and unique gameplay conditions that the classes don't usually offer, and more) as well.

Affixing is important but it is an extremely costly mechanic that has a lot of puzzle pieces that requires that if you are going to play with it that you don't mess up. Messing up an affix will definitely destroy the weapon you had before and is irreversible until you go through the effort to "fix" it.